Click to watch: “Are You a Quaker?”

Are You a Quaker?

Ensemble 12 Comments

Think you might be a Quaker? Watch this video!

Comments 12

  1. Dorothy Grannell

    City & State
    Portland Maine
    Great selection of speakers – represents the varieties of Quakers.

  2. Bonnie Rose

    I spent my life as a pacifist. Hippie tree hugger. Activist peace freak. Ex-church goer. 6 or 7 years ago I became a Convinced Quaker, realizing that is what a really was all along. Being a very small community, we have Meetings twice a month, and I can not wait to go. So glad to belong.

  3. Lourdesmarie

    City & State
    94533
    There are no Quaker meetings in my community. The closest one is in Napa. Any chance there would be a new group in Fairfield area, Solano County? Calif.

  4. Robin

    City & State
    Winnemucca Nevada
    The Quakers are one of the few Christian churches that has any appeal to me. The nearest one is a three hour drive away. And I’m not sure how I would be accepted – I am a transgender woman.

  5. Donne Hayden

    City & State
    Maineville, Ohio
    Thank you for including voices over the full range of Quakers!!!!

  6. JDM

    Sadly, apart from believing in a “direct experience of God” and “that of God in everyone,” this cumulative description of being a Quaker seems pretty nebulous. And even the phrases mentioned are pretty vague. It seems we’ve traded the apocalyptic Christian urgency of early Friends for a late modern attitude of, “do this if it feels right for you.” This may attract a small amount of people today who think of themselves as “spiritual but not religious,” but I’m not optimistic about the potential of this message to sustain Quakers for another 350 years.

    I write this as a lifelong Quaker in my late twenties, who loves the tradition and consider my experiences in meeting for worship and in communities of Friends to be the most formative experiences of my life. But for me being a Quaker means so much more than what is articulated in this video. It means, as it did for Fox, that I have found that “there is one, even Christ Jesus who can speak to my condition,” a condition of sin and alienation from God. It means, as it did for Woolman, that I am called to take up my cross as Christ took up his, and to learn that “it is no longer I who live but Christ who lives in me.” To be made one with God through Christ is also to be called to love my neighbors, my enemies, and all of creation.

    I realize many Quakers today will not identify with what I have just described as being Quaker. Yet I also know that a significant amount will. My hope is that Quakers content with the dictum of “that of God in everyone” and nothing else will recognize how much of what was central to the experience of our spiritual ancestors is being left out or left behind. Unless we begin to confess that what is “of God” in a person is Christ, and have the courage to name our experience of God as an experience of entering into Christ’s life, death, and resurrection, I have little hope that our movement will cease its steady decline in Europe and North America.

  7. Brigitte Alexander

    City & State
    Kennett Square
    Perhaps Quaker Speak should be more explicit about the great variety of Friends, variety in belief and in practices: Christo-centric, non-theist, programmed, unprogrammed, etc. Quite a view of the speakers do not speak for me, a life-long Friend; and other listeners seem to have the same experience.

  8. Robin

    I’ve been to one Quaker meeting, and something significant happened to me there, not in the meeting itself, but in the meeting house just before the meeting. I admit to being a little puzzled about what I have read about the Quakers – in some ways they seem an open minded, accepting, very different kind of Christianity that I find appealing, but other in other ways they sound a lot like conservative right wing Christians, who I want nothing to do with. I am interested in being part of a spiritual community, unfortunately it seems like there is nothing in the small town I live in.

  9. Barbara Richardson-Todd

    City & State
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Interesting to hear the speakers talking abouta Quaker “church”. George Fox was adamant thatthey were “Meeting Houses” and not the “Steeple Houses.” I don’t think a UK Quaker would refer to it as a Church.

  10. Erica B

    City & State
    Farmington, nh
    Thank you for having this information available. I’ve taken Christ into my life and live as a Christian. I’m interested in learning more as I feel most connected to God when I’m alone or sharing thoughts or time with a close friend.

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